Using DAX to Normalize Data in Power BI

A challenge to which I infrequently return is attempting to create various “new” chart types using only Power BI’s native visuals. For example, I have tried to replicate a Horizon chart and Slopegraph in Power BI without the use of custom visuals. In many cases, we can use DAX, selective filtering, or other tricks to…

10 Ways to Create Maps in Microsoft Power BI

Last year, I wrote a post entitled 5 Ways to Create Maps in Microsoft Power BI. With the introduction of numerous mapping changes in Power BI since then, I felt it best to provide an update as of June 2017. As I mentioned in last year’s post, each mapping method could have advantages in different circumstances. The…

Every Detail Counts

Recently, I encountered a visual created using Power BI’s default color theme that made me take a second look — for the wrong reason. I created an alternate visual that shows the same issue I noticed straightaway. Does anything quickly stand out? The default Power BI color theme assigns green, then black, then red in sequence. Sometimes,…

Creating Slopegraphs in Power BI

Did you know that it’s easy to transform Power BI’s Line Chart into a Slopegraph? No DAX or fancy workarounds are required. Slopegraphs are a great way to judge the rate and magnitude of change by looking at the steepness of a line’s slope. With a slopegraph, it is also easier to discern how different elements…

Building Horizon Graphs in Power BI

Horizon graphs are an intriguing but initially confusing way of looking at time series. Once you get familiar with the layout, you can simply think of it as a more space-efficient way of rendering a common line or area chart. Where there is a broad range in the data from low values to high values, horizon graphs condense…